Vintage Ceramics South Africa

Vintage Ceramics For Sale in South Africa

RARE VINTAGE MID CENTURY NORWEGIAN FIGGJO AS 29-PC DINNER SERVICE – FISH HERRING PATTERN — November 22, 2021

RARE VINTAGE MID CENTURY NORWEGIAN FIGGJO AS 29-PC DINNER SERVICE – FISH HERRING PATTERN

💲(♨️FIGGJO AS, 1941 – present day)

FIGGJO was founded by Harald Lima and Sigurd Figved in 1941, as a small-scale pottery workshop. Turid “Turi” Gramstadt Oliver joined Figgjo in 1960 and over the next 20 years created some of their most loved and collectible designs. These colorful and fun designs are highly collectible today.

Markings: TURI-DESIGN, CLUPEA, MADE IN FF NORWAY.c1960s.

6 x Side Plates

6 x Salad Plates

6 x Dinner Plates

6 x Soup Bowls ( One is chipped😐)

2 Soup Tureens

2 x Platters

DM to secure

FOR SALE BY AFFILIATE

Visit our IG: https://www.instagram.com/vintage_ceramics_southafrica/

KALAHARI WALL PLATE – AFRICAN WOMAN — August 2, 2021

KALAHARI WALL PLATE – AFRICAN WOMAN

🔒 (♨️Kalahari Studio Ceramics, 1949 – 1973)
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***VINTAGE KALAHARI WARE STUDIO POTTERY HANGING WALL PLATE SOUTH AFRICA 1950s – BEAUTIFUL AFRICAN WOMAN***
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Dimensions: 260 x 30 mm
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Markings: Hand painted
K A L A H A R I
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Circa: late 1950s or early 1960s
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#vintagekalahari

Condition: Immaculate except for 2 small fleabite chips – see slides

SOLD

SOME INTERESTING EXAMPLES OF VINTAGE CONTINENTAL CHINA AND CONSTANTIA TEA/COFFEE SET — June 6, 2021
CARAVAN CROCKERY / KARAVAAN BREEKWARE — March 16, 2021

CARAVAN CROCKERY / KARAVAAN BREEKWARE

The Caravan industry and community has some very interesting examples of crockery produced by commercial pottery houses such as Constantia and Continental China. Very durable vitreous china coffee/tea sets that has to survive being knocked around without chipping or cracking. As Vintage Ceramics South Africa we are very interested to list such examples on our various Social Media platforms for people to enjoy. As with all our listed items, our aim is to photo log vintage ceramics for posterity and if there is interest, sell it to prospective buyers. Unlike Bidorbuy or Gumtree we don’t remove the items after a sale but will place SOLD as the photo caption. We will list on behalf of others and charge R 100 commission for each item regardless of value or number of items for sale in the set. The onus is then on the seller whom we present to ship the items/s bubble wrapped to customers and we are merely the middleman. For more information visit https://www.instagram.com/p/CLFaPKhJp7b/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

Visit our Caravan Crockery Page. Besoek ons Karavaan Breekware blad: https://vintageceramicssouthafrica.com/caravan-crockery/

THE CLARICE CLIFF STORY — January 28, 2021

THE CLARICE CLIFF STORY


Clarice Cliff (by Will Farmer) eBook available from Google Books (Buy here)

 

Excerpt


Clarice Cliff is one of the most instantly recognisable ceramic designers of the twentieth century. Her distinctive ‘Bizarre’ pottery, with its vibrant colour palette and dynamic patterns on equally daring forms, epitomises the mood of the Jazz Age.

During the Depression, Clarice flooded homes with colour offering her customers a glimpse of something new and exciting, far removed from the formal and staid styles of the first quarter of the century. Hers was a true success story founded on hard work, determination and an unwavering clear vision. Clarice was different, as was her ceramic art: a unique combination of inspired thought and design brilliance that created the perfect recipe for success.

Clarice was modern and fashionable woman of her time who demonstrated that she also had the skill to be a successful business-woman. As an industrial designer she had great intuition for what the public wanted, and between 1927 and 1936, at a time of high Art Deco, her shapes, colours and patterns ‘delivered’ where her competitors fell short. Whilst many other ceramics designers looked back, Clarice grabbed the ‘new’ with both hands: Art Deco, Modernism and Cubism. With an open mind and positive attitude she recognised the best qualities in these movements and developed them into commercially successful domestic wares.

Inspired by themes and ideas of art and design movements from around the world, Clarice’s longing for change was transferred to the surface of the pots she so ingeniously created. This, combined with a shrewd understanding of business, resulted in a product that unashamedly burst onto the market, introducing the consumer of the day to an entirely new style.

Such was the demand for Clarice’s work that, at its peak, the A.J.Wilkinson factory was recorded as producing 18,000 pieces a week with a turnover of £2,000, double that of her nearest competitor. Her wares were exported around the globe as far away as North and South America, Canada, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand. Towards the end of the 1930’s, however, Clarice, ever wise in business realised that the entire spirit of the times was about to change and that she could no longer be quite so daring or experimental. Her wares still continued to sell but had lost the dynamic flair and excitement of those early years.

Today’s modern approach to women in business makes it difficult to appreciate just how successful Clarice was. Colley Shorter, her boss and later her husband, was a genius at promotion and publicity, and the levels of interest and press coverage received by her products were unprecedented; over 360 articles and reviews of her distinctive Bizarre ware were published during the key years of 1927 to 1936. Compare this to one of her most well-known competitors of the day – Susie Cooper – who achieved barely twenty in the same period. In recent years a huge amount of new research has re-appraised Clarice the designer, the businesswoman and, most importantly, the artist.

End of excerpt

If anyone has Clarice Cliff we can check with our network of collectors locally and abroad if they would be interested in buying them. Clarice Cliff was sold in South Africa and we have some interesting and unique examples. Please get in touch through our contact-us form or DM / message us on Instagram, Facebook or on WhatsApp (number on the contact- us page).

Prices paid for Clarice Cliff

They fetch higher prices in the UK. Visit https://www.bananadance.com/ to get a general idea, but do remember that some Clarice Cliff crockery pieces like plates fetch very little and collectors in South Africa pay a fraction of what overseas collectors pay.

See this example of price discrepancy – but definitely an opportunity for collectors.

Same item for sale – on two opposing online platforms: bidorbuy.co.za in South Africa and bananadance.com from the UK.

More Clarice Cliff resources:

https://www.claricecliff.com/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clarice_Cliff

https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/ihtml?_from=R40&_trksid=p2380057.m570.l1313&_nkw=clarice+cliff&_sacat=0

 

Vintage Ceramics South Africa reserve the rights to publish this extract for the purposes of research.

 

A GUIDE TO CLASSIFYING COLLECTABLE ENGLISH CERAMICS OF HISTORIC INTEREST — May 31, 2020

A GUIDE TO CLASSIFYING COLLECTABLE ENGLISH CERAMICS OF HISTORIC INTEREST

This blog post is an extract from the online website GOV.UK, an official website for the UK government to find government services and information. Source: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/classifying-ceramics#classifying-collectable-ceramics-of-historic-interest

Introduction

Many ceramics are collectable, but not all are of historic interest. To be considered for historic interest ceramics must meet the following conditions:

  • they must have a certain rarity value
  • they are not normally still being used for their original purpose
  • when they are bought and sold, the transaction is of a special nature that’s significantly different from the normal trade in similar utility articles
  • they are of high monetary value
  • they illustrate a significant step in the evolution of human achievements or a period of that evolution. For example, this may be the use of a new ceramic production technique or the ceramic piece itself might represent a period of human history

There are certain ceramic designers and makers whose work is considered to be of historic interest. Some of these designers and makers – along with details of their most important pieces of work – are listed below.

Burleigh Ware

Burleigh Ware of historical interest includes:

  • the relatively common parrot and kingfisher handles
  • the rarer cricketer, tennis player, golfer and soldier of the 1930s
  • the 1940s toby jug depicting Sir Winston Churchill with a bulldog peeping out from between his legs

Carltonware

Pieces of the Art Deco period.

Clarice Cliff

The Bizarre, Fantasque, Crocus and Applique pieces produced between 1928 and 1936.

Crown Devon

All pieces from the 1930s.

Hans Coper

All statues.

John Ruskin Pottery

All pieces.

Midwinter

The Cannes design by British architect Sir Hugh Casson, who played an important part in the Festival of Britain.

Moorcroft

Pieces designed by William Moorcroft between 1913 and 1945.

Poole pottery

Poole pottery of particular significance includes:

  • the work of Art Deco designers John Adams and Truda Carter, and Harold and Phoebe Stabler from the 1920s and 1930s
  • pieces from the 1950s
  • the Delphis range made in the 1960s and 1970s
  • the Studio Ware range by designer and maker Robert Jefferson, who opened a branch of the pottery to produce experimental pieces

Rosenthal of Bavaria

All pieces.

Royal Doulton

Royal Doulton pieces of historical interest include:

  • the Toucan that was produced between 1920 and 1946. Although it had a long production run, it was not a popular piece at the time and is now rare and highly sought after
  • the figure designed in 1919 by sculptress Phoebe Stabler

Susie Cooper

Pieces produced in the 1930s.

TG Green

Cornish Ware produced between 1928 and 1960.

The Shelley factory

Art Deco tableware pieces, in particular the ranges of children’s wares designed by Mabel Lucie Atwell.

The Goldscheider factory

Art Deco figurines produced in the 1920s and 1930s.

Wade

The three polar bears on an ice floe produced in the 1950s. This is a rare example and fetches high prices.

Wemyss

The pigs produced in the 1930s.

Commemorative jugs of Edward Heath and Harold Wilson from the 1970s are also considered to be of historical interest because there’s so little commemorative ware relating to these two British Prime Ministers.

WHY BUY VINTAGE SOUTH AFRICAN WARES? — September 29, 2019

WHY BUY VINTAGE SOUTH AFRICAN WARES?

By Kobus Venter


Dr. F. G. E. Nilant, of the Department of History of Fine Arts, University of Pretoria, South Africa once said “In Europe the factory in which an object has been made is an eminently important consideration when people choose porcelain or earthenware. People feel proud to have in their possession a piece made in some world-famous pottery or other. In South Africa the circumstances are quite different. People are not only indifferent to, but quite unaware of, the various potteries in existence”.

Little has changed towards locally manufactured ceramics.

The rapid urbanisation that accompanied the South African economic boom of the 1950s inflated the costs of urban residential property. This led to the building of smaller homes and apartment blocks. It is speculated that ceramic items were ideally suited to serve as wall decorations in smaller, as well as lower-income homes. Ceramic wall-plates could be used as substitutes for paintings, as they were probably relatively inexpensive in comparison to framed original works of art or commercial reproductions. It is argued that ceramic decorative items had various practical advantages over two- and three-dimensional artworks. Due to their glazed finish, they could easily be cleaned and the variety of colors and images meant that ceramics could be used to decorate almost every room in the home. The South African ceramics industry, which was initiated in the post-war economic boom, and which at its peak included between thirty-two and thirty-nine factories and studios, was virtually defunct by 1965. The ceramics industry experienced a decline from approximately 1957 due to the substantial losses of income which were experienced as a result of the relaxation of import controls by the South African government and the ‘dumping’ of inexpensive Asian and American ceramics on the South African market.

Source: ‘Scorched Earth’ by Wendy Gers.

🌸Bottom line: There is a finite supply and that means increased value🌸